My Top Ten Vegan Pantry Essentials

My vegan pantry essentials

Ever wondered what a vegan keeps in her pantry? Well, look no further than this – just joking, I’m not going down the route of cheesy blog post opening lines.

Anyway, I’ve compiled a list of the top ten ingredients you’ll always find in my cupboard. I eat a vegan diet composed mostly of wholefoods, but this is suitable for anyone who wishes to expose themselves to the joys of eating more plants and having plenty of healthy ingredients within reach.

These items are affordable and many can be cooked in bulk for the week ahead as a means of saving time, money and energy. Moreover, they act as a basis for the majority of vegan recipes out there. When it comes to cooking, I like to plan ahead and will buy ‘fancier’ extras whenever they are required (i.e., those magical superfood powders sourced from the soils of Narnia – I admit I can never hold myself back from diving head first into food trends) but always ensure my kitchen is well stocked with the basics because no one likes getting to their chickpea curry night and discovering they have no chickpeas.

Before I give myself the opportunity to ramble on for three thousand words, here are my pantry staples:

1. Legumes

Beans and pulses

You knew this one was coming. I am in love with my beans and pulses. These contain an abundance of micronutrients such as iron and potassium, and are often the main protein source in vegan diets. As someone who is trying to build muscle, the latter is enough to make me stock my cupboards with an excessive amount of black beans.

I keep both canned and dry in my kitchen. Canned is great for convenience, but I use dry whenever I have a bit of extra time, as they require soaking and cooking, and want a ‘fresher’ taste. My favourites include:

  • Black beans – these are a great option for buying fresh and soaking overnight
  • Chickpeas – roast them with some agave nectar and paprika and thank me later!
  • Cannellini beans 
  • Red kidney beans
  • Lentils: red, green and black
  • Dried soya mince – an incredible meat free alternative for spaghetti bolognese!
  • Peas
  • Giant lentils 

2. Rice 

This carb source deserves its own category. I have rice several times a week and it never fails me as a side dish – or even a main because it tastes delicious and sometimes after a hard workout, I crave nothing other than humongous bowl of white rice. It comes in many varieties, including jasmine, basmati, wholegrain and black. Sticky rice is great for when you finally decide to tick ‘master the art of sushi making’ off your bucket list (anyone fancy a tutorial?)

3. Root vegetables 

Potatoes, butternut squash and beetroot

Root vegetables for vegan pantry

My mum happens to own a cute little allotment, and having access to homegrown veggies is an extra bonus for us: this is probably the most vegan thing I’ve ever said, but everything does indeed taste better when eaten straight for the ground (after appropriate preparation, of course). When we’re not eating our own, we buy our root vegetables from farmers’ markets to help smaller, ethical businesses and live a sustainable lifestyle by reducing waste.

Potatoes, whether white or sweet, deserve to be categorised as a superfood. Whenever I’m utterly clueless in regards to my next meal, my go-to option is a jacket potato with canned lentils in tomato sauce. Sounds a bit unorthodox, but it tastes amazing. Potatoes are the cosiest thing to eat on wintry evenings, whether they’re boiled or roasted as healthy chips. Some of my other root veggie favourites include:

  • Butternut squash
  • Pumpkin
  • Hokkaido squash
  • Kabocha squash
  • Turnips
  • Beetroot (a great twist to homemade hummus)
  • Parsnips

4. Noodles and pasta

I am a typical carb-loving millennial. Once, I tried those zero-calories noodles and I’m not going to lie – they tasted like crap. The real thing, however, is delicious and versatile. Both pasta and noodles are inexpensive and just like potatoes, can be turned into hundreds of dishes or eaten by themselves after one of those long days when the last thing you want to do is make a Pinterest-worthy dish. My staples include:

  • Noodles: buckwheat, wholegrain, rice (white and brown), soba and udon.
  • Pasta: tagliatelle, spaghetti, penne, vermicelli, fusilli, shells, lasagne sheets. If you’re a vegan, be sure to check the ingredients as many pastas contain eggs.
  • Spinach pasta deserves a special mention, and if you haven’t tried it yet you’re missing out!
  • Edamame noodles

Vegan noodles and pasta

5. Snack bars and protein powder

The existence of vegan protein powders doesn’t imply the impossibility of meeting your protein requirements in their absence on a plantbased diet. However, as someone who is trying to build muscle and increase strength, I need more protein than the average person and always look for convenient way to consume extra calories and protein when I don’t have much time to cook. For most people, however, supplements will not be a kitchen staple as average protein requirements can be met with little second thought.

22068667_2040995666136999_1045450601_o

However, I’d recommend stocking up on healthy snacks as a go-to solution for that post-breakfast, pre-lunch hunger. My top five at the moment:

  • Clif Builder in chocolate peanut butter
  • Anything from Pulsin
  • Trek original oat flapjack
  • Beond raw chocolate bars
  • Bounce almond and kale balls

6. Grains 

22015324_2040995629470336_209223245_o

Rye flour and bread flour

I always keep my pantry well-stocked with different grains. Before I went vegan, I didn’t know such a wide variety existed, but as I did my research and taught myself culinary skills, I soon discovered a list which I can only hope to try before my days on this planet come to an end. These can be used to make delicious side dishes, salads or even main courses.

  • Oats! I have oatmeal at least three times a week and will never stop. If you’re someone who skips breakfast due to a shortage of time, try an overnight oats recipe as a delicious solution.
  • Quinoa
  • Pearl barley 
  • Bulgur wheat 
  • Flour: we keep different types for different occasions, including wholegrain, all purpose, rye, spelt and chickpea (my new obsession!). I use these to make the homemade bread I eat most days for breakfast.
  • Buckwheat – I ate this all the time as a child in Russia and finding this in my local Tesco filled my heart with joy.
  • Polenta 
  • Couscous – this works wonders in big salad bowls.
  • Rice puffs

7. Nuts and seeds

Nuts and seeds

These add that perfect crunch to any meal or baked goodie, and can come in handy for more ‘exotic’ recipes such as cashew mozzarella or chia puddings (I only understood the hype surrounding chia puddings once I tried one myself).

  • Nuts: cashews, peanuts, walnuts, pistachios, pecans, almonds
  • Seeds: chia, linseed, poppy seeds, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds
  • Ground almonds to use for baked goodies

I guess shredded coconut goes into this category because apparently it is a nut, a fruit and a seed simultaneously?! You really do learn something new every day.

8. Condiments, sauces and spreads 

Coconut oil and other sauces

I love adding extra flavour to all of my recipes, and experimenting with different combinations of sauces as my creative outlet. I make quite a few of my sauces myself, such as the tahini dressing I mention in this post, but do love an occasional store brought option.

  • Nut butters: one of the advantages to making them at home is price. ‘Natural’ nut butters tend to be pricier than those heavier in preservatives. Homemade nut butters carry more health benefits and do not break the bank, however, in terms of store brought, my favourite brands are Meridian and Whole Earth.
  • Tahini, as mentioned above, can be used to flavour anything from falafels to pizza. But as a word of warning, learn from my mistakes and do not eat this by itself!
  • Vinegars: balsamic, apple cider, red wine.
  • Coconut oil – I mostly use this for my skin/hair as opposed to cooking.
  • Olive oil and olive oil cooking spray. 
  • Mustard 
  • Soy sauce / Liquid aminos 
  • Sriracha 
  • Nutritional yeast – after seeing this all over social media, it took me a while to try nutritional yeast myself and now I believe it is a vital constituent of a plantbased diet. Not only does it have a delicious cheesy flavour, but it is a source of B12 and aids digestion.
  • Lemon and lime juice – I prefer to use fresh but lemons and limes is always the one thing I forget to buy during my shopping trips.
  • Agave nectar. No pancake recipe is complete without my favourite sweetener of all time.

Vegan pantry nutritional yeast

Peanut butter, cashew and tahini

9. Canned tomatoes and coconut milk

These goodies are essential to dozens of recipes and are a definite staple in my kitchen because pasta dishes with tomato sauce, as well as various curries, are staple meals for me. If I know I’m going to have a busy week, I cook up enough spaghetti to last at least five days, and in a separate pot stir a few cans of tomatoes with my favourite spices, before combining them and allocating the mixture to Tupperware boxes with a protein source and salad. Couldn’t be simpler.

Canned tomatoes and coconut milk

10. Spices

My spice collection

I’m someone who hates clutter but tend to hoard spices because, well, they make any dish taste incredible. Anyone who is into their cooking can probably relate to the excitement of discovering a new spice. For example, a tofu scramble wouldn’t be complete without a pinch of turmeric and roasted potatoes go hand in hand with dried basil. I won’t list my entire spice collection (most of them are displayed in the photographs) but my favourites include:

  • Cumin
  • Turmeric
  • Paprika and cayenne pepper
  • Fenugreek (this one is super underrated)
  • Curry powder 
  • Cinnamon, of course

My spice collection

BONUS number 11 – treats! 

‘Treats’ are intrinsic to a healthy vegan kitchen because a healthy diet is about practicing balance rather than completely eliminating your favourite foods. Healthy eating should be fun and include everything in moderate amounts. I don’t like calling these items ‘treats’ because that insinuates guilt (aka a sentiment which shouldn’t be associated with eating in any way, shape or form) but saying ‘treats’ is easier than ‘foods diet magazines would push people to avoid but I do not have a problem with and eat whenever my heart fancies’. I challenge you to find yourself a bae who looks at you how I look at my accidentally vegan Lotus biscuit spread 😉

Vegan shopping list

Now, it’s your turn to share – what do all of you like to keep in your pantries? What are your staple dishes?

(A fridge edition of this post will be up within the next few weeks)

Love, Maria ♡

Instagram | Twitter | Pinterest

Follow my blog with Bloglovin 

 

 

34 thoughts on “My Top Ten Vegan Pantry Essentials”

  1. I wish I could at least attempt the vegan lifestyle sometime-reading this post just makes me so aware of how healthy and balanced most vegan diets really are. Unfortunately I live with a very meat-loving family lol so I doubt I can soon. Really enjoyed reading this though (:

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yess I’m quite fortunate because my mum doesn’t eat many animal products and I usually cook for myself because our schedules are so different but your situation is completely understandable – but there’s always time in the future! I’m so glad you liked reading it 🙂 ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  2. omg your spice drawer is literal goals!!!! i have been DYING to try edamame pasta & nutritional yeast and have yet to…good thing i have to place an Amazon order later!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ahh thanks so much dear!! I definitely do love my spices 😉 And you definitely have to try both of them asap – they are life changing. I put nutritional yeast on basically everything! ❤

      Like

    1. Haha well it’s great that I could answer your question! There definitely isn’t that much of a difference when you take into account foods like fake meats/cheeses. And yes nuts and seeds do tend to be on the pricier side around here! Whenever I visit Russia I always bring back bags of cashews because they’re MUCH cheaper there lol. x

      Like

  3. I couldn’t live without beans and root vegetables, they are big part of my daily food income. I am vegetarian because I can’t let go of cheese, and I have tried vegan cheese but it’s just not the same (obviously). I really adore you full vegans xx

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yaay for a fellow bean/root veggie lover! The fact that you’re a vegetarian is great and you should be super proud of yourself 🙂 I know that a lot of people struggle with cheese and I guess I was quite fortunate because I didn’t eat it much prior to going vegan. Thanks so much for your comment girl! ❤

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Elizabeth! Thank you so much for stopping by and I am glad you liked the post 🙂 homegrown veggies are awesome – you should maybe start with growing a small tomato plant in a pot? I love your blog as well! ❤

      Like

  4. This was a really interesting post; we have a lot of similar foods in common (although I’m not vegan; I just don’t particularly like or eat much meat) – and yes yes yes you know about that biscuit spread! I love your posts; they’re always so professional and interesting xx

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ahh thank you so much Mia, I am so glad you liked this post and that means a lot to me 🙂 That biscuit spread is amazing, isn’t it?! Not gonna lie, at times I have it several times a day lol. Enjoy the rest of your week! ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  5. That was a beautiful post, Maria, the photos were shot tastefully and I loved the humour that you injected into the post. Btw zero calorie anything tastes rubbish. Recently we bought low sodium salt and sprinkled it over popcorn. Suffice it say that I had to throw the whole bucket of popcorn and wash my mouth well to get rid of the awful taste of it!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Wow this is such a lovely comment – it really made my day! Especially the fact that you appreciate my attempt at humour 😉 And I’m glad I’m not the only one who thinks so – I would much rather eat higher calorie but nourishing and delicious foods than anything which has the word ‘diet’ before it lol. Enjoy the rest of your day! x

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Super interesting, thanks for sharing. I’m ‘only’ vegetarian, but many of those, especially pasta and rice, are staples for me, too. Here in England they’re very good about labelling products ‘vegetarian’ or ‘vegan’, and that’s really helpful.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Being vegetarian is amazing – well done for making a difference 🙂 And I can definitely agree with the labelling thing, I absolutely love health food stores as well which are specifically tailored towards people with our dietary requirements! Thanks so much for stopping by 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Oh my goodness, I had no idea Lotus spread was accidentally vegan. I’m definitely getting some next time I go to Tesco. I’ve only recently started to eat a vegan diet (I’ve been veggie for years) and I’m starting to learn about what thing I always need to keep in so I can throw something together. I completely agree about having some kind of treat in, especially when there are non-vegan treats in the house as well – if I’ve not got something, the temptation is real. I haven’t given into it yet and I’m making sure I’ve always got something to snack on if I want to.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for stopping by and for your comment Rosie! Yes that spread is my favourite thing in the world – I was so happy when I found out. I would definitely recommend finding snacks that you enjoy and stocking up on those for those moments of temptation. I remember them from my early days of veganism and having a large pot of hummus on hand was always helpful! I am sure you will fall in love with a vegan diet more and more as time goes on 🙂

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s