9 Tips to Stay Focused and Avoid Procrastination As You Write

When questioning whether writing is an art or a science, I can’t steer myself away from a conclusion stating ‘both’ in the boldest of typefaces. It is a craft multiple purposes, from educating and articulating scientific theories, to serving as a creative outlet. A similar multitude of skills and mindsets are involved. On one hand, you have adherence to formal rules of grammar and sentence structure, to certain tricks which distinguish compelling writing from bad, and on the other – an inner flame urging you to serve a grander purpose, whether personal, political or ‘art for art’s sake’.

Writing, regardless of the purpose with which you do it, demands an interaction between motivation and discipline. Dynamism and/or an engaging tone are difficult to achieve without a hint of adrenaline in your fingertips urging you to shift words from mind to page. When, however, a dent looms in your motivation and distractions saturate your immediate environment, discipline steps in and carries you to the end of your final sentence. Striking a balance between the two is the key to maximising the efficiency of your writing process.

How to write productively

We’re all familiar with that worst case scenario: you psyche yourself up to start a particularly tricky article, create a new document, write the title. Suddenly, an email illuminates your phone screen. Unwilling to keep the sender waiting, you respond. In the meantime, three more emails invade your inbox and to avoid unintended favouritism, you pen three more responses. In like fashion, you spend half an hour forcing out two hundred words of you article in between checking notifications and scheduling plans for the evening. Before you know it, a growling stomach lures you into the kitchen. You make a snack. You take the dog for a walk, run a marathon, learn a new language. By the time you return to the article, discarded mid-sentence, your heart drops with the thought: ‘what was I even talking about?!’

From talking to people, including those who characterise themselves as writers, I’ve noticed that writing is likely to evoke procrastination. There are many reasons for this: writing is difficult, involving both sides of the brain. Writers are vulnerable to perfectionism and dread the prospect of producing a puddle of incoherence as opposed to something memorable, enticing, rational. For this reason, you may find yourself taking longer than necessary to produce a written piece. Moreover, losing focus often creates a self-perpetuating spiral of doubt (the more you procrastinate – to either start or reach the dreaded conclusion – the more you question your abilities) and writing lacking flow and/or a consistent tone. Continue reading “9 Tips to Stay Focused and Avoid Procrastination As You Write”